upcycling

Greener Consumption: The lagniappe edition

Greener Consumption: The lagniappe edition

“Lagniappe” is a concept from my Southern Louisiana childhood — it translates roughly as “a little something extra,” and refers to things a merchant might toss in with a purchase (think a baker’s dozen). This week, I thought I’d give you a little lagniappe on some of our previous Greener Consumption themes. So if you’re looking for new reuse projects, green items for the kids or more indoor gardening ideas, we’ve got ‘em.

Greener Consumption: The upcycled home-decor edition

Greener Consumption: The upcycled home-decor edition

Need a new look at home? Or just want to spruce up a room? Dreading the thought of paying for the new decor for that transformation? We’ve got you covered with a variety of upcycling projects and recycled items you can buy.

Greener consumption: The all-bottled-up edition

Greener consumption: The all-bottled-up edition

Empty bottles — what do you do with them? For most of us, the answer is “throw them in the recycling bin.” Others look at those bottles, made of either plastic or glass, and see serving trays, jeans or water heaters. See the many things you can do with a used bottle in this week’s Greener Consumption.

Greener consumption: the using what's available edition

Greener consumption: the using what's available edition

What do you do with stuff when its reached the end of its useful life? Usually we trash it, but there’s probably still some kind of use left in it. From take-out containers to phone booths, here are some product ideas that make use of that “garbage.”

Green tech finds: the app-a-palooza edition

Green tech finds: the app-a-palooza edition

Planning to do some biking and walking in London, and want to get rewarded? Or spending time in Cambodia, and want to report illegal wildlife sales? We’ve got apps for that.

Green tech finds: the energy from the sea edition

Green tech finds: the energy from the sea edition

Electricity from lobsters? Kelp as a model for renewable energy generation? Yep, we’ve got those stories, and more, in this week’s green tech finds.

Wearing used coffee pods: Single-use coffee machines are convenient, but you end up with all of those used pods you have to throw away, right? Designer Rachel Rodwell saw potential in those pods, and her Podtex concept uses them as materials for clothing and jewelry. See how she transforms them in the video above. (via Do the Green Thing)

Green tech finds: the orangutan edition

Green tech finds: the orangutan edition

If they’re in the wild, you can count them with a drone. If they’re in a zoo, you can give ‘em an iPad. Monkey business and more in this week’s green tech finds.

Wash your own diapers and grow your own soap: Cloth diapers have big environmental advantages, but they also require a lot more effort than disposables. The Swish is a diaper washing system that not only runs on solar power, but also uses greywater to grow soapnuts. (via Earthtechling and @crispgreen)

Green tech finds: big ideas in small packages

Green tech finds: big ideas in small packages

A “camper van” built over an electric bicycle may not attract a lot of buyers, but a 480 square foot off-grid cabin (with plenty of amenities and style) just might. Those and more in this week’s green tech finds.

Green tech finds, 9/8/11

Green tech finds, 9/8/11

Harvesting runner power, turning plastic back into oil and becoming a (virtual) upcycling magnate: your green tech finds for the week.

Charge your phone with your shoes: If you run or walk regularly, you’re creating mechanical energy that’s going to waste. The Instep Nanopower concept offers a way to capture that power and transfer it to electronic devices via wi-fi. (via Inhabitat and @EcoverUS)

Become a Trash Tycoon on Facebook: Tired of Farmville? Guerillaapps new Facebook-based social game Trash Tycoon (which is sponsored by upcycling company Terracycle) gives you the opportunity to build a virtual recycling empire. (via Crisp Green)