THE PERFECT STORM

George Clooney: Five great indie movie roles

Article: George Clooney: Five great indie movie roles

One of the most influential, successful stars in Hollywood is also — luckily for fans of innovative filmmaking — not afraid to take risks. Though he has starred in the kind of huge, slick hits that have established him as a dashing leading man, his tastes have always veered more political, more satirical. In THE PERFECT STORM — airing Sunday at 10P on Sundance Channel — Clooney is the captain of a Massachusetts fishing boat desperately holding onto a dying industry who goes out for one more big catch with a hurricane and two other massive weather events bearing down. But nothing could capsize this megastar's compellingly diverse, endlessly entertaining body of work. It was hard to whittle it down, but here are five of our very favorite Clooney indie roles.

George Clooney: Five great indie movie roles

Article: George Clooney: Five great indie movie roles

One of the most influential, successful stars in Hollywood is also — luckily for fans of innovative filmmaking — not afraid to take risks. Though he has starred in the kind of huge, slick hits that have established him as a dashing leading man, his tastes have always veered more political, more satirical. In THE PERFECT STORM — airing Sunday at 10P on Sundance Channel — Clooney is the captain of a Massachusetts fishing boat desperately holding onto a dying industry who goes out for one more big catch with a hurricane and two other massive weather events bearing down. But nothing could capsize this megastar’s compellingly diverse, endlessly entertaining body of work. It was hard to whittle it down, but here are five of our very favorite Clooney indie roles.

Filmmaking at the speed of pink

Article: Filmmaking at the speed of pink

Filmmaking is becoming a brain science. According to an article “Bringing New Understanding to the Director’s Cut” in the Science section of the New York Times, cinematic language is beginning to align more and more with our natural brain patterns. Researchers at Cornell University have discovered that directors are increasingly using groups of shots of a similar length, edited together in clusters. They call it 1/f (one over frequency) or they call it “pink noise.” Apparently this pattern of pink noise is everywhere in our world…. in a heart beat, the flow of tides and traffic, the movement of our stock market, in the movie BACK TO THE FUTURE (apparently a very pink movie) and most interestingly in the way we think! So the fact that movies might unknowingly take advantage of this pattern almost sounds like accidental brainwashing – perhaps a very good kind of brainwashing but certainly with some questionable side effects. It could at least give me a good excuse for why I sometimes involuntarily cry during the cheesy sad moments of mediocre films (on an airplane with no audio)…