THE INTERRUPTERS

5 films that prove the Spirit Awards are better than the Oscars

Article: 5 films that prove the Spirit Awards are better than the Oscars

The old adage is just as true of awards shows as it is of movies: bigger does not mean better. The Oscars might get all the press, they might have all the prestige, but that doesn’t mean they’re superior to all other movie awards. Case in point: this year, the Spirit Awards, the Oscars’ indie alternative, the Elizabeth to the Academy’s Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, honored all sorts of outstanding movies that barely even garnered a mention on the big show. Does that mean those films were inferior? Nope; it means the Oscars were. Here are five films that prove the Spirits Awards’ are better than the Oscars.

Film intelligence: Pardon the interruption

Article: Film intelligence: Pardon the interruption

Every week there are dozens of film news stories. Every week, we read them all and bring you the five most important ones in the single most important blog post you’ll ever read (today [at this moment]).

Film intelligence: Documenting the new Best Documentary Oscar rules

Article: Film intelligence: Documenting the new Best Documentary Oscar rules

Every week there are dozens of film news stories. Every week, we read them all and bring you the five most important ones in the single most important blog post you’ll ever read (today [at this moment]).

1. Documenting Big Changes for the Best Documentary Oscar

Every year the movies that do and do not get nominated for the Best Documentary Academy Award become a huge source of contention. In 2011, popular and acclaimed documentaries THE INTERRUPTERS, SENNA, and BEING ELMO — and JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER, cried ten thousand beleaguered Beliebers — all missed the doc Oscar shortlist. To rectify the situation, the Academy announced this week they are overhauling the nomination process for the Best Documentary category: among the changes, films will now need a one-week commercial release in New York and Los Angeles and a review from the New York Times or Los Angeles Times. Hopefully these changes will help the best and most important docs get the recognition they deserve and we’ll never hear about Oscar documentary controversies again. On the other hand, you never say never. [Indiewire]