South Africa

Occupy Durban: Addressing global warming for the 99%

Occupy Durban: Addressing global warming for the 99%

Back when I was a full-time academic, I swear we held meetings simply for the purpose of scheduling more meetings. That seems to be what’s happening with international climate change negotiations: each round of talks since Bali in 2007 seems to degenerate into a punting of major issues to the next round. This week, delegates have gathered in Durban, South Africa to discuss a global response to climate change, and some representatives of smaller countries most affected by global warming think it’s time for new tactics. In short, they’re talking about an “occupation” of the meetings.

Is Africa creating the model for a green economy?

Is Africa creating the model for a green economy?

When you think of international leadership towards a green economy, countries in Europe and Asia probably first come to mind: Germany’s leading the pack in terms of implementing clean technology, and China’s right there in terms of manufacturing it (even though it has a ways to go with its own environmental challenges). You might have a tough time thinking of an African nation contributing to the concept of economic growth through environmentally benign practices… and yet, according to a new report from the United Nations Environment Programme, nations such as South Africa and Kenya are creating green economic models that could serve as templates for other countries, both developing and developed.

What do you do with a used vuvuzela?

What do you do with a used vuvuzela?

Last Summer’s World Cup may seem like a distant memory, but if you really got into the South African soccer-fest, you may still have a vuvuzela laying around the house. You’re not alone: according to Triplepundit, sales of these plastic noise horns reportedly reached 20,000 per day during the football frenzy.

Now that the party’s over, what can you do with that vuvuzela… besides tossing it?