SO-IL

P.S.1 MoMA's Young Architects Program

P.S.1 MoMA's Young Architects Program

From Matter Architecture Practice: “We have yet to effectively update this site.” Emerging indeed!
Earlier this week, P.S.1 MoMA announced the finalists for the 2011 Young Architects Program, their award for emerging architecture firms. The winning firm gets to take over P.S.1′s front outdoor garden space, where the museum hosts a string of events as soon as the weather allows. The five competing firms have the next three months to put the finishing touches on their proposals before the final decision is made in February.

Warm Up at P.S.1

Warm Up at P.S.1

The rendering

The real thing
Remember back in January when P.S.1 MoMA announced the Brooklyn-based husband and wife duo SO-IL winner of this year’s Young Architects Program? If you got excited about the renderings for their winning design, the cheekily titled Pole Dance, get even more excited now that the actual space is up and ready for you to play in all summer long. As a refresher: Pole Dance is made of 100 free-moving poles, centrally anchored in a shallow pool and held together by a net that’s only ‘taut enough.’ The interactive structure encourages visitors to engage with the poles, to yank them around and tug on the net that holds up lots of big, bright rubber balls, creating and playing a kind of ‘rule-less’ game.

Summertime pole dancing at P.S.1

Summertime pole dancing at P.S.1

In a time when it’s difficult for up-and-comers in any field to get jobs, especially those working freelance, prizes have become an increasingly useful means of getting your name out there. That can mean a magazine’s annual award, the upcoming Sundance Film Festival (42 of the 113 films are from first-timers) or P.S.1 MoMA’s Young Architects Program, which has helped launch designers like SHoP, Linda Roy, nARCHITECTS and Work AC into the public eye.
This year the honor goes to the Brooklyn-based husband and wife team SO-IL for their entry Pole Dance, 100 free-moving white poles centrally anchored in a shallow pool and held together by a net that’s only “taut enough.”