safety

You can pry the steering wheel out of Chevy Volt owners cold, dead hands (despite fiery rumors)

Article: You can pry the steering wheel out of Chevy Volt owners cold, dead hands (despite fiery rumors)

Heard about the Chevy Volt fires? Seems like you’re most likely to answer “yes” to that question if a) you’re a true car geek, or b) you get your news from right-leaning media. Conservative commentators have latched onto news about fires in two of the vehicles after test crashes as proof of everything from the immaturity of the battery technology to logical outcome of government investment in the auto industry. In response, General Motors has not only worked closely with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on its preliminary investigation, but also offered Volt owners loaner cars and even buy-backs to address potential concerns.

What's up with all the organic food recalls?

Article: What's up with all the organic food recalls?

Organic food’s supposed to be safer than produce, meat, and dairy raised by conventional methods… right? Organic growers and ranchers are no doubt dealing with that question regularly over the past couple of weeks: between recalls of salmonella-contaminated sprouts and ground beef possibly laced with E. coli, it’s likely many are questioning the value of organics.

How Consumer Reports tests condoms

Article: How Consumer Reports tests condoms

Consumer Reports recently tested a whopping 15,000 condoms (bought by one dude!) representing 20 models. Alas, there was no actual-use testing done in the lab on the slab, just the boring scientific stuff: packaging examination, stretching, measuring, filling them with liquid to check for leaks, and inflating them with air to the size of 5-gallon…

Arsenic, Lead Found in School Supplies, Cars, Child Car Seats

Article: Arsenic, Lead Found in School Supplies, Cars, Child Car Seats

Tests for toxic chemicals in ordinary school supplies, children’s car seats, vehicles and pet products have detected lead, arsenic and heavy metals, according to the nonprofit Ecology Center that analyzed the products.