review

Rave Reviews for the “Brilliant” Second Season of “Rectify”

Rave Reviews for the “Brilliant” Second Season of “Rectify”

RECTIFY’s upcoming second season wins praise from Indiewire as “unique in its subject matter, tone, and visual splendor,” while The A.V. Club says the season premiere contains “one of the most beautiful sequences to be seen on television in this or any year.” See what everyone is talking about.

Critics Praise Season 2 of “Rectify” and Aden Young’s “Riveting” Performance

Critics Praise Season 2 of “Rectify” and Aden Young’s “Riveting” Performance

RECTIFY's upcoming second season wins acclaim from Entertainment Weekly for its "engrossing meditation on the complexities of redemption," while The Denver Post highlights the "fine cinematography, great acting and probing character development." See what the buzz is all about, watch the first 12 minutes of RECTIFY Season 2 on Buzzfeed now.

Sundance Review: You’ve Never Seen a Vampire Movie Like the Beautiful, Touching A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT, Produced By Elijah Wood

Sundance Review: You’ve Never Seen a Vampire Movie Like the Beautiful, Touching A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT, Produced By Elijah Wood

For centuries, vampires have provided handy metaphors for social and physical dilemma, but in the stylishly muted deadpan romance A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT, the threat is personal. Writer-director Ana Lily Amirpour’s stunning debut, produced by Elijah Wood, follows the experiences of a small Iranian town haunted by a vampiric presence who’s just as lonely as the other locals.

Sundance Review: Despite a Hilarious Setup, Madeleine Olnek’s THE FOXY MERKINS Is a Disappointing Sophomore Effort

Sundance Review: Despite a Hilarious Setup, Madeleine Olnek’s THE FOXY MERKINS Is a Disappointing Sophomore Effort

In 2011, Madeleine Olnek’s debut feature, CODEPENDENT LESBIAN ALIEN SEEKS SAME, premiered at Sundance to positive (if ultimately limited) reception. Made on a shoestring budget, (think space ships made out of tin foil), the warm and witty spoof on sci-fi B-movies firmly established the writer-director’s singular comedic sensibility. In her follow-up, THE FOXY MERKINS, Olnek turns the male hustler genre on its head to imagine what a lesbian prostitution ring in might look like.

Sundance Review: Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig Are As You’ve Never Seen Them In Otherwise Conventional ‘The Skeleton Twins’

Sundance Review: Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig Are As You’ve Never Seen Them In Otherwise Conventional ‘The Skeleton Twins’

Outside of their Saturday Night Live work, Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig have delivered some of their best performances onscreen together, in ADVENTURELAND and PAUL (they even both scored scene-stealing voice cameos in Spike Jonze’s HER). Even so, their chemistry in Craig Johnson’s THE SKELETON TWINS is something altogether different: These are serious dramatic roles with dark comedic ingredients that take them out of the farcical realm and allow them to craft fully realized characters.

Sundance Review: J.K. Simmons and Miles Teller Impress With a Ferocious Student-Teacher Dynamic in WHIPLASH

Sundance Review: J.K. Simmons and Miles Teller Impress With a Ferocious Student-Teacher Dynamic in WHIPLASH

BY EMMA MYERS Legend has it that Charlie Parker only became Bird because Jo Jones furiously threw a cymbal at his head when he choked on stage. At least that’s the story Fletcher (J.K. Simmons), the barbarous band conductor in Damien Chazelle’s WHIPLASH, uses to justify the emotional and physical abuse he subjects his students…

Miranda July's bleak but charming THE FUTURE

Miranda July's bleak but charming THE FUTURE

Miranda July (Photo credit: Yvan Rodic/FaceHunter).
One of the latest films to land a distribution deal is Miranda July’s THE FUTURE, the filmmaker’s much-anticipated follow-up to 2005’s ME AND YOU AND EVERYONE WE KNOW. On Friday, it was announced that Roadside Attractions will be releasing THE FUTURE.

But despite Indiedom’s worship of all things July, and the mania stirred by ME AND YOU, THE FUTURE was one of those films that scratched, as opposed to scorched, the Earth in Park City. Reviews were mixed—”bleak but charming” was an oft-heard refrain—with much fuss made over the fact that the film is narrated by a cat; a device that people we spoke to, anyway, found either brilliantly imaginative or bizarre.