prius

Green tech finds – 8/18/11

Article: Green tech finds – 8/18/11

Old school shipping, CO2 as a source of fuel and yet another new solar technology for charging your phone: this week’s green tech finds.

Another recycling robot: While not as directly practical as the ZenRobotics Recycler we mentioned in an earlier post, Florida Robotics‘ Dr. R.E. Cycler is designed for educational purposes – essentially, to show kids what happens to the aluminum cans that go into those blue bins. Take a quick look at it above. (via Fast Company and @TaigaCompany)

Green tech finds (10/14/10)

Article: Green tech finds (10/14/10)

A solar-powered motorcycle, a geothermal motherlode in West Virginia, and Abraham Lincoln meets clean energy… your green tech finds for the week.

  • The solar-powered Suzuki: Purdue University physics major Tony Danger Coiro has received a provisional patent for the ’78 Suzuki motorcycle he converted into a solar-powered vehicle. Check it out in the video above… (via Cleantechies)

  • More Google renewable investments: The Internet giant has announced a $5 billion investment in a mid-Atlantic offshore wind “grid.”
Green tech finds (1/07/10)

Article: Green tech finds (1/07/10)

Will 2010 be a good year for green tech? Looks like it from the first finds of the new year…

Green tech at CES: It’s that time of year again… the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show opened today in Vegas, and CNET is keeping on top of green tech on display.
The sun doesn’t shine all the time: That’s one of the criticisms of solar power… but start-up Sun Catalytix thinks it might have a solution to storing energy produced when the sun is shining: mimic photosynthesis.

Green tech finds (5/28/09)

Article: Green tech finds (5/28/09)

Here’s your weekly run-down of breaking green tech stories…

Reversing Climate Change Can Start In Your Mailbox

Article: Reversing Climate Change Can Start In Your Mailbox

The endless products stocking the shelves of the world require industry to extract mountains of natural resources. Junk mail is very similar in that it can create enormous piles in your mailbox while simultaneously requiring a large amount of wood, water, energy and chemicals to make. If there was a company that specialized in stopping…