occupy

Occupying the mountaintop–Tennessee's prayers for the planet

Occupying the mountaintop–Tennessee's prayers for the planet

While those of us following the Occupy movement online or on television may see it as a fairly conventional protest movement, complete with marching and chanting, a quick look at various encampments (or remnants thereof) around the country shows something quite different: alternative communities that value the input of all participants. Those communities themselves are the real protest: by living something quite different, even temporarily, Occupiers are able to highlight the absurdities of the current political structure.

Collection of Occupy movement posters

Collection of Occupy movement posters

If you plan on heading to an Occupy protest in your local hometown and want to wave a message that’s a step up from the crude signs made from pizza boxes and random flattened bits of cardboard (or like the one that Anne Hathaway was spotted carrying recently) then head on over to Occuprint. It’s a well produced online resource that “showcases posters from the worldwide Occupy movement” and “is meant to connect people with this work, and provide a base of support for print-related media within the Occupy movement.”

Occupy Durban: Addressing global warming for the 99%

Occupy Durban: Addressing global warming for the 99%

Back when I was a full-time academic, I swear we held meetings simply for the purpose of scheduling more meetings. That seems to be what’s happening with international climate change negotiations: each round of talks since Bali in 2007 seems to degenerate into a punting of major issues to the next round. This week, delegates have gathered in Durban, South Africa to discuss a global response to climate change, and some representatives of smaller countries most affected by global warming think it’s time for new tactics. In short, they’re talking about an “occupation” of the meetings.