New Yorker

The New Yorker calls Top of the Lake “funny, sexy, disorienting, and emotional”

Article: The New Yorker calls Top of the Lake “funny, sexy, disorienting, and emotional”

Emily Nussbaum dove into Top of the Lake for this week’s New Yorker and loved what she found. “‘Top of the Lake’ is a trip worth taking–visually magnetic, but also funny, sexy, disorienting, and emotional.” The complete review is behind the paywall, but we’ve got some of the best details for you. Peter Mullan gets…

Do spoiled children grow up to be bad sex partners?

Article: Do spoiled children grow up to be bad sex partners?

Is it possible that bad parenting could lead to bad sex? Could spoiled and selfish kids grow up to be spoiled and selfish bed partners? A recent article and book review in The New Yorker, “Why are American kids so spoiled?,” got us thinking along these lines.

One great New Yorker cover…and the three rejects that come with it

Article: One great New Yorker cover…and the three rejects that come with it

The timely cover of the latest issue of The New Yorker celebrates President Obama’s decision to make a very public stand in favor of gay marriage which he believed was important for him to “go ahead and affirm that I think same-sex couples should be able to get married.” I think its long been clear which side SUNfiltered falls on this debate, which in my mind shouldn’t even be a debate in the same way interracial marriage is no longer an issue. Bob Staake, the artist who created this cover

Portraits of lost silent film stars

Article: Portraits of lost silent film stars

In a reminder of the old becoming the new yet once again, as you all know unless you’ve been in a cave somewhere, the black-and-white silent film THE ARTIST won three golden dudes including Best Picture at this year’s Academy Awards. This film’s success makes relevant this lovely slideshow from The New Yorker of portraits of forgotten actors, such as Louise Brooks dramatically posed above, from that silent era to accompany David Denby’s piece on “the art of silent acting” in the magazine. Although I’m happy for everyone that was involved with the film and I particularly appreciated the aspirations of their intentions, I do ultimately agree with David’s review of the film:

The perfect New Yorker cartoon

Article: The perfect New Yorker cartoon

My friend Casey shared on Facebook the cool news that one of his friends had a cartoon published in the latest issue of The New Yorker, the holy grail of publications that feature cartoons (at least in my eyes!). It reminds me of this wonderful essay by the New Yorker Cartoon editor Bob Mankoff on what he considers to be “the perfect cartoon” which was drawn by Chon Day in 1946 (seen above) and selected from the thousands published in their magazine. At first glance I found it relatively unexceptional, but the brilliance of the cartoon, as Mankoff explains, is the subtlety of its dark humor which is achieved with a high degree of difficulty.

First covers of famous magazines

Article: First covers of famous magazines

From The Atlantic Monthly in 1857 to Wired in 1993, here’s a fascinating look at the covers of the first issues of famous magazines, including, I’m sure, at least one of your favorites. It’s kind of amazing to see how these magazines have evolved over the years. Some are radically different in terms of design, focus and content, while others – most notably The New Yorker, whose first issue stars Eustace Tilley, or New York Magazine, with its breathtaking photo of the most beautiful skyline in the world – look as timeless and instantly familiar then as they do today…

Roger Ebert's winning New Yorker caption

Article: Roger Ebert's winning New Yorker caption

After years of submitting his punchline to The New Yorker’s caption contest found in each issue, film critic Roger Ebert finally won after 107 attempts with the above entry to the accompanying cartoon. Of course, not every winner gets a write-up by the magazine’s cartoon editor Robert Mankoff who shared some of Ebert’s previous entries. My juvenile alter-ego found the one below, which didn’t get past the cartoon censors, plane-ly hysterical. Congrats Mr. Ebert!

Covering Christoph Niemann's nuclear flowers

Article: Covering Christoph Niemann's nuclear flowers

The New Yorker has an interesting look behind the process that led to the final design of their recent cover (see above) created by Christoph Niemann (a SUNfiltered favorite) which reflects the delicate ongoing struggle and tragedy in Japan. This assignment was difficult because, as Niemann explained, “A drawing often comes across as lighthearted, and…

Photographing art audiences

Article: Photographing art audiences

Jessie Wender touches on one of the truisms about art: sometimes the audience can be just as, if not more interesting. For The New Yorker, she highlights a selection of photographs, including one of my favorites picture above (Elliott Erwitt, “57th Street Gallery, New York City, USA,” 1963) that reflects the lens back at the…

Creation of a New Yorker cover

Article: Creation of a New Yorker cover

Familiar readers of SUNfiltered might have noticed my obsession with all things The New Yorker covers related. This is a bit older, but I just came across it and apropos to the recent State of the Union address by President Obama, watch how Bob Staake created the cover of the October 13, 2008 issue. It’s…

Literal New Yorker cartoon captions

Article: Literal New Yorker cartoon captions

My new favorite website for high-brow chuckles: Literal New Yorker Cartoon Captions. [Via]

Collection of rejected New Yorker cover ideas

Article: Collection of rejected New Yorker cover ideas

New York City based artist and teacher at SVA Tomer Hanuka shared some of his rejected New Yorker cover concepts. This one went so far as a final version, but I like this one above that he describes as “one about Winter / Valentine’s day / over-heated apartments / relationships.” Who knows, maybe it’s just…

RIP Leo Cullum, New Yorker cartoonist

Article: RIP Leo Cullum, New Yorker cartoonist

Leo Cullum, a New Yorker cartoonist for 33 years (and a TWA pilot for 30 years) passed away on October 23. He was 68. You may not immediately recognize his name, but most SunFiltered readers I’m sure have chuckled at more than a few of his 819 cartoons published in the magazine. By the 1980s…

New Yorker covers via iPhone art

Article: New Yorker covers via iPhone art

Artist Jorge Colombo now has four New Yorker covers under his belt, which may or may not be his preferred method of carrying his iPhone, which also happens to be the tool that he uses to create and paint the art for these covers. As the iPhone and the apps have built quite a active…

New Yorker analyzes readers' bookshelves

Article: New Yorker analyzes readers' bookshelves

The New Yorker’s blog “The Book Bench” has recently been poetically analyzing their readers’ bookshelves from the photographs they submit. Here, they interpret Italian reader Maria Sepa’s: From the celestial sphere, knowledge, immaterial at first, rains gently into the minds of men; from there it falls onto the pages of books; and from there it…