Julianne Moore

Further proof that TV is the new film

Further proof that TV is the new film

It’s old news that the increased presence of high-profile film stars in TV land is just another not-so-subtle sign of the recession in action: Those usually used to a fat paycheck from the film studios have had to think out of the box — or rather, right into it, as have 2012 Emmy nominees Glenn Close of Damages, Kathy Bates of Harry’s Law and Steve Buscemi of Boardwalk Empire, to name just a few. But their presence is also a sign of another larger shift in the entertainment media landscape, one that has also been in development for a while now: The boundaries between the kind of content on TV and in film may be disappearing altogether.

People can't seem to stop remaking CARRIE

People can't seem to stop remaking CARRIE

“They’re all gonna laugh at…who?”

There are some truly horrid things out there that just won’t die. One is the soon-to-be-remade (again!) CARRIE, Stephen King’s exceptionally underrated debut novel (if this were required reading in every American high school, there would probably be no ‘bullying crisis’) and the brilliant 1976 Brian de Palma screen adaptation with Sissy Spacek, masseur-loving John Travolta and Piper Laurie. Laurie, it’s worth noting, made the honorable mentions in our Top 10 Mothers In Legendary Films list for Mother’s Day—and come to think of it, she deserved her own maniacal place in the list itself for this Oscar-nominated role.

Julianne Moore as Hillary Clinton

Julianne Moore as Hillary Clinton

THE SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP aired last year on HBO and it portrayed the relationship between former President Bill Clinton (played by Dennis Quaid) and his then UK counterpart across the Atlantic Tony Blair (Michael Sheen). Hope Davis played the role of Hillary Clinton. However, originally Julianne Moore was cast as the First Lady before backing out…

Sundance Film Festival follow up: THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT

Sundance Film Festival follow up: THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT

When director Lisa Cholodenko’s THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT debuted at the festival, it sparked audience enthusiasm so great it was matched only by one of Sundance’s most intense bidding wars ever. Eventually snapped up by Focus Features, KIDS went on to win Best Feature at Berlin International Film Festival’s Teddy Awards. It also topped…

The women are all right, in fact they look human!

The women are all right, in fact they look human!

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT really stayed with me. As in, I kept thinking about the situations, hearing those characters’ voices, and seeing globs of hair in my own shower drain. (That’s not a spoiler, and hopefully inspiring the curiosity of the disgusting and weird in those who’ve not yet seen the film – only movie I know in which drain hair plays a key role.) And seeing those women, Annette Bening and Julianne Moore. What do I see? Hair on the legs on Julianne, no make up on Annette, wrinkles on both. And you know what? It’s awesome.

The Kids Are All Right, So Is The Porn

The Kids Are All Right, So Is The Porn

Perrin recently reviewed THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT, a new movie starring Annette Bening and Julianne Moore as lesbian mothers. It is the longest time I have ever spent with a lesbian couple in my entire life here on this great earth. And was rather enjoyable. Who knew?

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT

It’s funny how movies get lumped together. Just before seeing Lisa Cholodenko’s new film THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT, I overhead a friend recommending it to his skeptical mother by saying “No, really it’s good. It’s not another GREENBERG.” Meaning, I suppose, that like GREENBERG it stars the ponderous middle-aged bourgeoisie in a film that is essentially composed of a series of conversations. Unlike GREENBERG, however, the conversations in THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT actually seem to accomplish something. And as an added bonus we aren’t stuck for a whole film with one small, angry man but with an entire nuclear family, off-balance though they may be.

CHLOE and the problem of tone

CHLOE and the problem of tone

It’s been coming up a lot in filmmaking class — what is the importance of tone, how do I get it, how do I keep it, what happens when it goes awry?

CHLOE, in theatres now, is an erotic thriller from brilliant filmmaker Atom Egoyan. (My husband almost wrote his dissertation on Egoyan – so I’ve seen all of his work – and he’s fabulous.) The screenwriter Erin Cressida Wilson (SECRETARY, FUR) is someone I know and respect whole-heartedly. She’s a wonderful writer. So why didn’t I walk out of CHLOE glowing? These are some of my favorite artists. Julianne Moore? C’mon, awesome. Liam Nisson? Check. But I didn’t glow. And I’m mad about it and I want to know more about why I didn’t. Glow, that is.