interviews

“BABYLON’s” Cast and Crew Discuss Preparing for the Series

“BABYLON’s” Cast and Crew Discuss Preparing for the Series

In a market saturated with police dramas, BABYLON stands out. The series’ writers, Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong, found a fresh angle for the series, and developed complex characters that have been brought to life by a diverse group of talent. Read on to find out what Sam and Jesse have to say about the extensive research that went into this project and to find out how actors Jonny Sweet, Adam Deacon, Jill Halfpenny and Bertie Carvel prepared for their roles.

Sam Bain: We met quite a lot of cops both in and out of the Met. I think the main thing was trying to figure out what was a fresh angle, because you couldn’t count the amount of cop shows, cop films and cop novels—you wouldn’t be able to stop. And it was daunting in that respect. You have a genre which is way past the point of saturation. We wanted to do things that we hadn’t seen before. Danny was very into getting a modern take on the genre, with all the cameras, all the digital surveillance, the drones and iPhones. And I guess one thing that we decided early on was to feature everything except the detective level. Because most cop shows have the detectives at the heart of it, and we don’t have any detectives in the pilot or in the series. It’s just people above or below that band because, apart from anything else, we didn’t think that we could compete with all those great shows.

Jesse Armstrong: Personally, I did a lot of reading, I’ve read…

BABYLON’s Cast On the Strengths of the Scripts

BABYLON’s Cast On the Strengths of the Scripts

James Nesbitt (Richard Miller), Nicola Walker (Sharon Franklin), Paterson Joseph (Charles Inglis), Bertie Carvel (Finn) discuss what they think the chief strengths of the Babylon writers, Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong, are.

James Nesbitt (Richard Miller): Clearly, I knew their work before. They have natural quite dark humour, and they’re constantly evolving. They created a very rounded, complex character in Richard Miller. I think their observation of how policing is changing…

BABYLON’s Cast On How the Show Has Changed Their Opinions of Policing

BABYLON’s Cast On How the Show Has Changed Their Opinions of Policing

James Nesbitt (Richard Miller), Paterson Joseph (Charles Inglis), Nicola Walker (Sharon Franklin), Jonny Sweet (Tom Oliver), Adam Deacon (Robbie) and Jill Halfpenny (Davina) discuss the extensive research they did before taking on their roles and how their involvement in the series has affected their opinion of the police.

James Nesbitt: I think publications beforehand, particularly on the right of the political spectrum, might have thought that this was going to be…

Notable Quotables from the “RECTIFY” Cast

Notable Quotables from the “RECTIFY” Cast

When the RECTIFY cast isn’t knocking it out of the park on set, they’re known to give some pretty great interviews. Check out some of the choice quote from the main cast, and click through to read their full interviews:

Aden Young on being recognized by fans: “You’d go to a supermarket and there would be a few people following me around, and they do have a look as if they’re expecting you to stand still for twenty minutes staring at a protein bar.”

5 Ways to Prepare for “RECTIFY” Season 2

5 Ways to Prepare for “RECTIFY” Season 2

Counting the days until RECTIFY Season 2? Here’s a handy guide of things to do in the meantime.

Em & Lo on The Interview Show

Em & Lo on The Interview Show

Yep, we just referred to ourselves in the third person…again. Remember a few weeks ago we told you we were going to be on The Interview Show in Brooklyn? No? Well, here’s the video of us on Chicago comedian and humor columnist Mark Bazer’s show anyway. We thought he was going to be asking us things like “What’s the weirdest advice question you’ve ever gotten?” or “What’s the best/worst thing about writing about sex?” You know, the fun cocktail conversations we never seem to have in real life. Instead, Mark asked us real, honest-to-God sex advice questions. The nerve! It was like work, except without the benefit of us being able to pick and choose the questions we want to answer and spending hours polishing our responses to make ourselves seem effortlessly witty. The veil has been lifted:

Em & Lo on "The Interview Show" in Brooklyn this Thursday

Em & Lo on "The Interview Show" in Brooklyn this Thursday

Yes, we just referred to ourselves in the 3rd person (sorry). But just wanted to let you know that we’re going to be at Union Hall in Park Slope this Thrusday at 8pm (doors at 7:30) for “The Interview Show” hosted by syndicated humor columnist (and Lo’s old friend) Mark Bazer. The Interview Show is usually held monthly at the Hideout in Chicago and features musicians, authors, comedians, athletes, community activists, chefs, etc. shooting the shit. Past guests have included Brian Denehey, Mark Maron, Wilco and Peter Sagal (of “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me” fame, pictured above).

How to be a TV talking head

How to be a TV talking head

I’ve spent half my adult life appearing as a talking head on various TV channels, so by now I have the art of on-camera gabbing down to a T and know just what to do, what to avoid, and whether to watch the clip afterwards with one eye covered.

Live appearances on cable news are way different than pre-taped ones (like “101 Celebrity Meltdowns” or “The Fab Times of Lindsay”), so I’ll separate them in offering my unsolicited but extremely useful advice to anyone brazen enough to want to join the unpaid talking head population.

For live shows:

*Have your first answer ready. The worst thing imaginable on live TV is dead air, so you want to avoid ever pausing to think or stammering stuff like “Um, uh…” If your first answer doesn’t match the first question, then say it anyway—and make it match the question.

*Speak in four or five sentences at a time, trailing off when you’ve sensed that you’ve had your say on that particular subject and it’s time for someone—anyone–else to speak. Don’t be a monosyllabic caveman, but don’t monopolize the whole show either. Find a happy medium.

The Five Worst Celebrity Interviews

The Five Worst Celebrity Interviews

Interviewing movie stars is an Olympic-caliber game whereby you gently toss questions at them and they volley back by delivering succinct, crisp sayings that are informative, funny, and make great copy too.

Alas, that doesn’t always happen and you sometimes feel like you’re engaged in a battle of wits with a half armed opponent. Not me, mind you. My interviews have always been sheer perfection, cough cough. But a friend of mine who’s a longtime reporter has had some awkward star encounters that left his tape recorder metaphorically burning, and he anonymously agreed to share them with me.

His five worst have been:

The GQ interview with Rielle Hunter

The GQ interview with Rielle Hunter

Have you read the no-holds-barred GQ interview with Rielle Hunter, John Edwards’ mistress during his presidential campaign and father of her only child? It’s required reading. Not necessarily for the intimate behind-the-scene details you learn about Edwards’ relationships, both with Hunter and his wife Elizabeth, but for the voyeuristic door it opens into the mind…

Jazz history in iTunes U

Jazz history in iTunes U

I’ve been using the iTunes Music Store pretty much since the day it launched, but I’ve never really spent any time poking around iTunes U, the section of the store devoted to podcasts, videotaped lectures, and other content from universities, museums, and similar institutions. Participants include the Museum of Modern Art, the Tate Modern, the…

The un-zeitgeist interviewer

The un-zeitgeist interviewer

Like a Rip Van Winkle from the late ’90s, comic Gil Ozeri conducts interviews with random strangers in the streets of New York City asking untopical questions about Friendster, Enron, and the “Rachael” haircut, among others. [Via]