high line

Final stage of the High Line made public

Article: Final stage of the High Line made public

Had a chance to visit Manhattan’s High Line yet? If not, we’ve got you covered: we’ve been keeping an eye on this conversion of a railroad trestle into a park since its opening in 2009. But that opening didn’t represent the completion of the High Line; it was more of a launch, with more envisioned as time and money permitted. Last year, developers completed the project’s second section, and, last week, they released plans for part three at the Rail Yards.

Philadelphia ready to start on its own High Line project?

Article: Philadelphia ready to start on its own High Line project?

A couple of years ago, when we were all a-flutter over the opening of Manhattan’s High Line park, we may have mentioned that other US cities were bouncing around similar plans (though I’m having trouble finding it!). Even out here in flyover country, the concept of converting Old North St. Louis’ Ironhorse Trestle into an elevated green space is (slowly) taking shape. But Philadelphia may well be the next city to implement such a development: according to The Philadelphia Daily News, “The city is in talks with Reading International Co. to take control of the larger section of the [Reading Viaduct],” and plans are going forward on another section already owned by the city’s transit agency.

The High Line, part 2

Article: The High Line, part 2

The long awaited, much anticipated second section of the Chelsea High Line finally opened last week. Architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro enlisted landscape architects James Corner Field Operations and planting designer Piet Oudulf to complete the half mile-long stretch of elevated walkway. When the entire project is completed it will run 22 blocks through Manhattan’s West side, a total of 1.5 miles, divided into three half mile stages of construction. The first section, completed in 2009, drew crowds with its streamlined simplicity and elegance both in the landscaping and quality of building materials (benches, flooring, lighting design, etc.), but at only a half mile-long the original High Line walk was so short lived it was almost disappointing, especially given all the hype and anticipation leading up to its debut.

Diller Scofidio + Renfro talk about their latest projects

Article: Diller Scofidio + Renfro talk about their latest projects

Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio (above) and the new Lincoln Center (below).
Right after the successful completion of the High Line and the redesign of Lincoln Center in NY, the architecture firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro is back on the horse with two new and equally ambitious projects on the other side of the country, the Berkley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive and Eli Broad’s new contemporary art museum in downtown LA. The Architect’s Newspaper was able to pin down Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio long enough to talk about both these projects as well as the experience of working with Broad and what it means to be a ‘starchitect’ (spoiler alert: they don’t like that word).

Richard Chai + Snarkitecture

Article: Richard Chai + Snarkitecture

Now that the High Line’s HL23 condos have no further use for their onsite Sales Tin, the long, indoor rectangular box used as a model home display is getting a new life with Building Fashion’s series of architecture and fashion collaborations/installations. Each collab gets a two week shelf life before its swapped out with something…

Art and sour cream on the High Line

Article: Art and sour cream on the High Line

The High Line continues to be a hit here in NYC. This summer the park’s popularity has been enormous and will only continue to grow if these guys keep doing fun, innovative things with the space. Case in point was yesterday’s launch of High Line Art, which is a series of commissions and creative partnerships…

Culture wars: The New York Post vs. the Standard Hotel

Article: Culture wars: The New York Post vs. the Standard Hotel

The end of August is always a slow season for news–and nowhere is that more evident than in the New York Post’s extensive coverage of the Chelsea Standard Hotel “controversy.” This past Monday, the Post ran a story on a recently discovered feature of New York’s newly opened High Line park. In addition to offering…

Staten Island's Fresh Kills landfill undergoing transformation into park

Article: Staten Island's Fresh Kills landfill undergoing transformation into park

Turns out the High Line isn’t the only green space reclamation project going on in New York City: on Staten Island, the Department of Parks and Recreation, along with a host of other city and state agencies, is getting started on transforming the Fresh Kills landfill into a park. When completed in 2036, Freshkills Park “will be almost three times the size of Central Park and the largest park developed in New York City in over 100 years.”

HIGH LINE STORIES:  Realizing a dream…

Article: HIGH LINE STORIES: Realizing a dream…

Joshua David (L) and Robert Hammond (R) with High Line supporter, Ethan Hawke

Sundancechannel.com recently caught up with the very busy co-founders of Friends of the High Line, Robert Hammond and Joshua David, whose vision is captured in the Sundance Channel Original Series HIGH LINE STORIES.

The beautiful High Line is now open (see New York Times Architecture Review) and in Part 3 of our conversation (click here if you missed Part 1 and Part 2) Robert and Josh detail the mission of the Friends of the High Line going forward.

Reclaimed industrial facilities: Germany's Duisburg-Nord Landscape Park

Article: Reclaimed industrial facilities: Germany's Duisburg-Nord Landscape Park

If HIGH LINE STORIES has you searching out other innovative reclamation projects, you’re not limited to railroad easements, parking spaces, or even the United States. The closing of the Thyssen blast furnace works in Duisburg Meiderich, Germany, in 1985 led to some creative thinking on the part of the Duisburg City Council and other local leaders.

Guerrilla community activism: create your own green space on Park(ing) Day

Article: Guerrilla community activism: create your own green space on Park(ing) Day

Had a chance to watch HIGH LINE STORIES yet? If so, you’ve witnessed not only how abandoned infrastructure can be transformed into useful green space, but also how community activists, officials, and even celebrities can come together and organize a project of this magnitude. The contributions of all players provide a model for empowering other budding change agents.

But what if you simply don’t have the time, or other resources, to spearhead an effort like the High Line? Creating change in your community doesn’t have to involve months or years of full-time work… in fact, it may be as simple as claiming a parking space.

That’s the idea behind Park(ing) Day, an initiative created by San Francisco-based art collective Rebar in 2005. The premise is simple: on a single day, citizens transform metered parking spaces into Park(ing) spaces, or “temporary public parks.” While these parks only last for a day, the idea is to get people discussing green space in their communities… and how parking is often a bigger priority than parks.

HIGH LINE STORIES – Putting it together…

Article: HIGH LINE STORIES – Putting it together…

Robert Hammond and Joshua David with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (then New York Senator) on the High Line in 2006

Sundancechannel.com recently caught up with the very busy co-founders of Friends of the High Line, Robert Hammond and Joshua David, whose vision is captured in the Sundance Channel Original Series HIGH LINE STORIES.

In Part 2 of our conversation (click here to read Part 1 if you missed it!) Robert and Josh recount their crash course in preservation, legal action and grass roots organization during their efforts to follow through on re-purposing the High Line.

Katy Trail: the High Line's country cousin

Article: Katy Trail: the High Line's country cousin

If you’ve had a chance to check out HIGH LINE STORIES, you’ve seen how a group of creative people devoted to their community can turn blight into beauty.

Missouri’s Katy Trail is one of the crown jewels of US “rails to trails” projects. Running from Clinton (about 75 miles from Kansas City) to St. Charles (about 25 miles from St. Louis), the Katy Trail follows both the old MKT railroad line, and, in part, Lewis and Clark’s path along the Missouri River.

Like the High Line, the Katy Trail has not only provided reclaimed green space across the state, but also contributes to the economies of many of the small towns through which it passes. Towns such as Rocheport have revived themselves as tourist destinations, and numerous wineries have sprung up in close proximity to the trail. You could easily plan a biking and wine tasting trip of several days, with stops in Augusta, Hermann, Sedalia, and other small, picturesque communities.

Learn more about the Katy Trail…

HIGH LINE STORIES – In the beginning…

Article: HIGH LINE STORIES – In the beginning…

Robert Hammond and Joshua David, co-founders, Friends of the High Line

In conjunction with our new digital shorts series HIGH LINE STORIES, Sundancechannel.com caught up with the very busy co-founders of Friends of the High Line, Robert Hammond and Joshua David and learned more about how two citizens of New York City’s Chelsea neighborhood, who had never previously met, joined forces to save and re-purpose the High Line.

Learn the transformation of this elevated railway as New York City reinvents the urban oasis.

High Line Stories – New York City Reinvents the Urban Oasis

Article: High Line Stories – New York City Reinvents the Urban Oasis

Sundancechannel.com is excited to present HIGH LINE STORIES as part of our original programming in Digital Shorts. The series tells the story of the High Line in New York City, profiling those involved in transforming this 1.5 mile elevated railway along the west side of Manhattan into a park in the sky. From celebrities to…