Gary Oldman

Top 10 differences between the Gothams of Nolan and Burton

Top 10 differences between the Gothams of Nolan and Burton

Photo credit: Flickr: Stefan the Cameraman

Amazingly, Bruce Wayne has donned his Batsuit for the seventh time in a little over 20 years. The role of Batman has become a nouveau-James Bond of sorts, with a grand total of 4 actors portraying him thus far, in films directed by three different men. When the original BATMAN came out in 1989, comic book and superhero films were far from guaranteed successes, since effects and makeup hadn’t quite risen to the standards of what the deliriously imaginative comic creators could come up with. Nevertheless, Tim Burton’s BATMAN was a commercial and (mostly) critical success, enough to ensure delivery of the arguably better sequel BATMAN RETURNS three years later. Fast-forward (remember that?) to 2005, and MEMENTO director Christopher Nolan resuscitated the franchise with the much darker — and more realistic — BATMAN BEGINS, which in turn was also followed by a superior sequel, THE DARK KNIGHT. Pretty much across the board, the newer Batman films are considered to be the most relevant and successful, but there remains a small and embattled contingent of film fans who actively miss the old days of (pre-SLEEPY HOLLOW) Tim Burton.

Emile Hirsch, Gary Oldman & Jamie Bell: The gentlemen wear Prada

Emile Hirsch, Gary Oldman & Jamie Bell: The gentlemen wear Prada

Miuccia Prada can be as self-effacing as she’d like, eschewing the title of artist in the debate as to whether or not fashion designers should be consider as such, but she cannot deny her natural instinct for drawing attention. She was a mime in her youth. Her runway shows have always been blockbusters with plenty of star power in the front row, but it seems La Signora Prada is blurring the lines between art and fashion once again in her latest Men’s campaign for her Fall line, enlisting Gary Oldman, Garrett Hedlund, Jamie Bell and Willem Dafoe as mannequins for her designs. Like everything else she does, we can’t help but chat about it.

At the Oscars, it's hip to be square

At the Oscars, it's hip to be square

The Los Angeles Times just posted a massive investigation into the demographics of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the 5,765 largely anonymous voters who every year decide who will receive the highly coveted and ultra-influential Oscars. Their findings, which will come as a shock to no one who has watched the Oscars at any point in the last 25 years, revealed a membership that is very old and very uncool. 94% of Academy voters are white; 77% are male. 54% are over the age of 60; just 2% are under the age of 40.