Fonts

FONTS: Looking back at Gill Sans

FONTS: Looking back at Gill Sans

After much ado and delay, my website is finally ready to launch. Don’t worry, this post is not about me, but about an important decision I had to make during the web deign process, a dilemma most of us have faced at some point. I’m talking about font choice. The struggle to choose the perfect font almost feels like taking a personality quiz. Am I a serif or a sans sort of person? Am I simple, minimal, unadorned, light, heavy or possibly italic? The stress of discerning the subtleties between Garamond and Goudy or Baskerville and Bookman is not totally unlike that famous scene of the business card-obsessives in AMERICAN PSYCHO. But instead of sweating the competition around the board room Christian Bale-style, I sat alone in front of my computer screen, scrolling through my options. Futura is played out. Frutiger is awfully nice but it’s just not right for me. After hours I finally decided upon a venerable favorite, one I seldom get the opportunity to use on a regular basis, the streamlined yet friendly, direct yet inviting Gill Sans.

Font geeks, rejoice!

Font geeks, rejoice!

FF Blur by legendary designer Neville Brody
MoMA has been on something of an acquisitions spree of late, following up their recent purchase of artist David Woknarowicz’s controversial “A Fire in My Belly” (that’s the video of ants crawling over Christ’s body that the Smithsonian took down after it ruffled some feathers in the Catholic League) with 23 digital typefaces for its Architecture and Design collection. Before this, Helvetica was the only font in the 30,000-piece collection, but it’s now joined by equally famous brethren like Verdana and Gotham as well as less common fonts like Walker, Template Gothic and even OCR-A, which is used only in bar codes.

Green tech finds (4/8/10)

Green tech finds (4/8/10)

Ink-saving fonts, energy-producing homes, and pedal-powered prison television… here are your green tech finds.

  • No package? No pick up…: Sounds like a lead-up to dating advice, but it’s actually the concept behind UPS’ new Smart Pickup service for small and medium-sized businesses. Customers use a tracking service so that drivers only stop to pick up packages when there are some… (via SmartPlanet)

  • The font’s the thing…: Want to save printer ink? Change your font.
An inconvenient font

An inconvenient font

I absolutely loved this blog post over at Typotheque on Al Gore and fonts. Turns out that when Mr. Gore was working on his follow-up to An Inconvenient Truth, titled Our Choice, he and his team decided to us the font Brioni created by the NYC-based designers mgmtdesign. Everything was fine except for one thing:…