Filmmaker Interviews

Meet Max Mayer director of ADAM

Article: Meet Max Mayer director of ADAM

Meet Max Mayer director of ADAM, an official selection in the Dramatic Competition at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival. ADAM DIRECTOR/ SCREENWRITER: Max Mayer U.S.A., 2009, 95 min., color In movies, when two twentysomethings serendipitously wind up under the same Manhattan roof, witty repartee usually transpires, then sparks fly, and eventually they fall into bed.…

Meet Joe Berlinger director of CRUDE

Article: Meet Joe Berlinger director of CRUDE

Meet Joe Berlinger director of CRUDE, an official selection in the Documentary Competition at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival.

Cinetic Gives The Skinny On Sundance 2009

Article: Cinetic Gives The Skinny On Sundance 2009

There are many reasons for people to be nervous at Sundance, especially in this difficult economy. But those on the guest list for the big Cinetic party can relax on one account: The notoriously aggressive sellers (who brought NAPOLEOAN DYNAMITE and many other hits to Sundance) have nailed down their biggest sponsor for their fabled…

Meet John Hindman director of ARLEN FABER

Article: Meet John Hindman director of ARLEN FABER

Meet John Hindman director of ARLEN FABER, an official selection in the Dramatic Competition at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival.

Festival Programmer (John Cooper) On The Festival, The Economic Meltdown And Smelly Theaters

Article: Festival Programmer (John Cooper) On The Festival, The Economic Meltdown And Smelly Theaters

Good news! Weather.com is promising balmy temperatures in the 30s for the kickoff of the Sundance Film Festival this week. But if you listen to the words of John Cooper, director of festival programming, you can tell there’s still a chill in the air. He says there are wonderful films at the festival this year…

Remembering Derek

Article: Remembering Derek

A stark black-and-white photograph from 1992 shows a group of young filmmakers and critics (among them Tom Kalin, Isaac Julien, Todd Haynes, Sadie Benning, RubyRich and Derek Jarman) after a panel at the Sundance Film Festival entitled “Barbed Wire Kisses.” The photo marks not just a moment in history, but a moment when a history would begin. Later that year B. Ruby Rich would call this gathering the “New Queer Cinema” in an article for the British film magazine Sight and Sound, a term that would simultaneously serve as nostalgia for an artistic movement that never arrived and a promise of what independent cinema could become.

5 Things That Have Changed At Sundance By Ari Gold

Article: 5 Things That Have Changed At Sundance By Ari Gold

Ari Gold has been to Sundance with three short films: FROG CROSSING in 1997, CULTURE in 1999, and HELICOPTER in 2001. He also came to Park City as an actor in the 2000 Festival feature GROOVE. This year Gold arrives at Sundance with his directorial feature debut; ADVENTURES OF POWER [www.adventuresofpower.com], unfolding the epic story of an air drummer on a mission.

1. Who’s dancing? Stop exchanging business cards for a few minutes, people.

5 Things For Short Filmmakers To Know Coming To Sundance

Article: 5 Things For Short Filmmakers To Know Coming To Sundance

Last year Ian Olds was here at Sundance with his short narrative film BOMB, which was anything but.

1) Watch movies. It seems obvious, but it’s not. If you don’t make this a priority you could find yourself going mad on the quixotic quest to meet that one person who will magically grant you a career.

2) If one of your goals is to meet with agents and managers, don’t expect any of them to come to your screenings. Get copies of your movie to whoever wants to see it, preferably before the festival even begins, and if someone responds to your work you can use the festival week to meet face to face.

Sundance En Espanol

Article: Sundance En Espanol

Today, the Sundance Institute announced the events that are part of Sundance en Espanol, a celebration of Latin films and filmmakers participating in the Sundance Film Festival, January 17-27, 2008. This event features a collection of six Spanish Language films and four films in English by Hispanic and Latino directors, selected from the Festival program to screen in Salt Lake City on the evening of Wednesday, January 23, 2008. Each film was selected by the Festival’s programming team and reflects a variety of Spanish speaking cultures, from the indigenous Kuna Yala peoples of Panama to teens in Peru and struggling lovers in Mexico, seeking a better life. Sundance en Espanol celebrates independent films that speak to the diverse Latino communities, here in Utah,” says Jill Miller, Managing Director, Sundance Institute. “We chose films that range in place, voice and emotion, so our local community has a chance to enjoy some of the best offerings of the festival.”

Five Things To Know About Sundance: Craig Zobel

Article: Five Things To Know About Sundance: Craig Zobel

Craig Zobel premiered his southern comedy of music and fraud THE GREAT WORLD OF SOUND [www.greatworldofsound.com] at last year’s Sundance Film Festival to much acclaim. He’d been working in film and media for years — co-producing David Gordon Green’s debut feature GEORGE WASHINGTON and co-created the cartoon website Homestar Runner — but last year was his Sundance debut. His hard work was acknowledged by the Gotham Awards this fall when he was named the 2007 Breakthrough Director. His film is currently in limited distribution through Magnolia Pictures [www.magpictures.com] and will be available on DVD in February.

Craig was kind enough to tell us five things you should know before coming to Sundance.

Global Reach: Dramatic Jury Winner Christopher Zalla

Article: Global Reach: Dramatic Jury Winner Christopher Zalla

Christopher Zalla, the writer/director of this year’s Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic PADRE NUESTRO [festival.sundance.org] is an American independent filmmaker with a global perspective. His film, a neo-realist primarily Spanish-language thriller in which a case of identity theft awkwardly brings together a mismatched quartet of outsiders in New York, highlights the immigrant populations that make up New York with an empathy that makes them feel completely American.

Five Things I Took Away From: Carl Spence

Article: Five Things I Took Away From: Carl Spence

As the Artistic Director of Seattle International Film Festival (May 24 – June 17) and the Director of Programming at Palm Springs International Film Festival (January 4 – 15, 2007), Carl Spence spends all year watching films. So what will he remember from his experience this year at Sundance?

Five Things To Know Before Coming To Sundance (plus Five): Wash Wetmoreland And Richard Glatzer

Article: Five Things To Know Before Coming To Sundance (plus Five): Wash Wetmoreland And Richard Glatzer

Filmmaking duo Wash Westmoreland and Richard Glatzer show up last year to Sundance with thier low-budget no-star “kitchen sink” drama QUINCEANERA. They left winning both Grand Jury prize and Audience Award. Now we can learn from their experience.

Read more after the jump…

Five Things To Know Before Coming To Sundance

Article: Five Things To Know Before Coming To Sundance

Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden’s feature HALF NELSON was screened at the Sundance Film Festival. Picked up by Think Films, HALF NELSON has proved to be a critical break though in 2006. In addition to being nominated by for a number of awards, the film won the Best film, and Ryan Fleck was present the “Breakthrough Director Award,” at this year’s Gotham Awards [www.ifp.org]. Ryan and Anna offer their remembrances, and suggestions, for attending Sundance.

Welcome To Sundance 2007

Article: Welcome To Sundance 2007

On Jan 18, the Sundance Film Festival kicks off for another 10 days of packed parties, tragic fashion, smoke-filled business deals, overpriced restaurants, sightings of Paris Hilton, and, oh yes, films This year offers one of the most ambitious slates in recent years. Geoffrey Gilmore, Director, Sundance Film Festival highlights that “in this year’s Festival there is a breadth of subject matter, vision and innovative storytelling that is transforming the old idea of the American indie film.” (In Variety [www.variety.com], Gilmore went on to define that diversity.)