design

The Fifty Shades Generator

Article: The Fifty Shades Generator

Are you a print or web designer in search of exciting placeholder text? Are you a fledgling author struggling with a sex scene? You’re in luck! The Fifty Shades Generator creates “world-class literature based on a pre-defined vocabulary” — a pre-defined vocabulary of clever, creative and totally offensive slang for genitalia and coitus culled from places like ARRSE (british ARmy Rumour SErvice) and @50shadesofshit. Below is an example Lorem Ipsum-type paragraph created by the generator, but the hilarious explanation text of the site itself is worth a read. Is there no limit to the sex-obsessed genius of the Internet?

How I learned to stop worrying and love the box

Article: How I learned to stop worrying and love the box

I find that the older I get, the more I hear my friends and peers express a general ennui with their careers. I suppose it’s understandable. It can be tough to go from “you can be whatever you want to be!” to “here’s your office and don’t leave until you finish that memo.” We all eventually get pigeonholed into a box of one kind or another (more on the box in a minute). Even at parties and social gatherings, it’s less about who we are as individuals and more about “what we do.”

The youngest Apple fanboy and his homemade creations

Article: The youngest Apple fanboy and his homemade creations

The title of youngest, biggest Apple fanboy and technologist has been spoken for by a precocious five-year-old named London. His mother sweetly explains how her first iPhone ignited an obsession in London (or as she refers to him, the “Little Techie”) with all things related to Apple. As a result, their home is strewn with “at least 50 iPhone and iPods made out of paper, icons and applications built out of LEGOS, and cardboard laptops and broken keyboards filling his toy bins and bookshelf.” And luckily for us, these creations are now archived and displayed at a Tumblr all its own, Little Techie. I personally love the paper craft designed ones, such as this detailed iPad, but unsurprisingly LEGO bricks figure prominently in many of his models.

Book covers and the bikinis that match them

Article: Book covers and the bikinis that match them

Bikinis have finally met their match: Matchbook.nu has cleverly juxtaposed swimsuits in online stores with book covers that match. Not intentionally. I especially like that each comparison includes the first line of the book. My favorite is the example above, featuring David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, which has been the Bane to this Batman. The first sentence of Infinite Jest?
I am seated in an office, surrounded by heads and bodies.
Now that is an opening line.

"The New Yorker" covers the Olympics

Article: "The New Yorker" covers the Olympics

In case you haven’t heard, the Olympics have been going on across the pond in London, where Mitt Romney received a gold medal in the putting-your-foot-in-your-mouth event. Among other things, the games are an opportunity to look at where we are — and where we’ve been — both culturally and artistically. (Don’t believe the Olympics have an impact on design? Check out influential street artist Banksy’s latest work.)

Infographics: What they are, how to make 'em

Article: Infographics: What they are, how to make 'em

The recent past has seen an explosion online of infographics, many of which are quickly and virally disseminated. In fact, Visual.ly is a whole website devoted to the discipline. The field certainly isn’t new, and lately designers have been able to create some really wonderful infographics by leveraging computers. But what exactly is an infographic, anyway?

Great boxes throughout history

Article: Great boxes throughout history

What better way to pay homage to some of the greatest (and some not so great) boxes throughout history than this gallery from Vanity Fair, featuring everything from Pandora’s Box to the mailbox to the boombox, which provided the soundtrack of summer in city streets during the 1970s and ’80s.

Book covers vs. film adaptation posters

Article: Book covers vs. film adaptation posters

Hey cinephiles and bibliophiles, check out this great photo gallery from The Atlantic that compares the covers of famous books with the movie poster for their film adaptation counterparts. In general I find the book covers more elegant and expressive. Obviously there are marketing necessities in featuring movie stars on posters, but their presence can clash with the faces already created in the readers’ imagination.

Would you wear leather from a lab?

Article: Would you wear leather from a lab?

Leather’s a challenge for a good greenie. It comes from dead animals, and involves really toxic processing. On the flip side, though, it just looks really cool; no existing alternative can match it on that front. A non-toxic, cruelty-free alternative that really looked like leather would probably fly off of the shelves.

One great New Yorker cover…and the three rejects that come with it

Article: One great New Yorker cover…and the three rejects that come with it

The timely cover of the latest issue of The New Yorker celebrates President Obama’s decision to make a very public stand in favor of gay marriage which he believed was important for him to “go ahead and affirm that I think same-sex couples should be able to get married.” I think its long been clear which side SUNfiltered falls on this debate, which in my mind shouldn’t even be a debate in the same way interracial marriage is no longer an issue. Bob Staake, the artist who created this cover

Green tech finds: the energy from the sea edition

Article: Green tech finds: the energy from the sea edition

Electricity from lobsters? Kelp as a model for renewable energy generation? Yep, we’ve got those stories, and more, in this week’s green tech finds.

Wearing used coffee pods: Single-use coffee machines are convenient, but you end up with all of those used pods you have to throw away, right? Designer Rachel Rodwell saw potential in those pods, and her Podtex concept uses them as materials for clothing and jewelry. See how she transforms them in the video above. (via Do the Green Thing)

Neon theater marquees–An Americana of the mind

Article: Neon theater marquees–An Americana of the mind

Brightly lit marquee theaters in cities and towns, large and small, have long held a central presence as a place for the community to come together to enjoy shows, plays and movies. Urban revitalization projects aside, many of these theaters are now endangered due to a host of factors. The impact is, as The Atlantic noted, “As they become more rare, old marquees have taken on a deeper cultural meaning, frequently serving as visual anchors for a street or cultural district.” As a visual reminder of how sweet some of these theaters are, The Atlantic compiled a photo gallery of some of “

Peek into your favorite author's bedroom

Article: Peek into your favorite author's bedroom

Apartment Therapy put together this neat photo gallery of the bedrooms of 15 noted authors from Ernest Hemingway to Victor Hugo, whose room is particularly striking with its dark red embossed walls and decor. Pictured above is the rather austere space of Emily Dickinson, reflecting her reclusive lifestyle, and the tiny table where she wrote her poems. There’s a quiet beauty to it, but best expressed via this meme, I can’t help but ask:

Draperize your home: Get some affordable Mad Men style

Article: Draperize your home: Get some affordable Mad Men style

When I saw Don and Megan Draper’s find out where the set designers found every single item. You probably don’t have your own set designers, so I’m going to help you find a few products to midcentury-up your own abode:

Keeping it pretty: Art you can afford edition

Article: Keeping it pretty: Art you can afford edition

If you’re part of the one percent that can afford a piece of art by Andy Warhol, please stop reading this. You just don’t need any more tips. But for those of you who, like me, currently only covet a Robert Longo, or Kiki Smith, here’s a piece of advice. Forget about them! Value is in the eye of the beholder, and with the advent of independent e-commerce sites springing up we’re seeing an almost endless supply of new work by young artists that draw from contemporary culture. Giving us insight into how we’re ingesting the present world.

A new look for Lolita

Article: A new look for Lolita

Lolita, such a great book. So deserving of a great cover. One blogger held a contest. Now it’s being turned into a book, with designs from both contest entrants and solicited pieces by well-known designers. Here are all the links to follow:

Green tech finds: Got some organic matter lying around?

Article: Green tech finds: Got some organic matter lying around?

Dead leaves? Grass clippings? Fruit and vegetable peels? Sure, you could compost them, or you could turn them into robot fuel or solar cells. Plus, a gadget for harvesting the power you generate while walking, and an app for showing off your gas and carbon savings from driving a plug-in vehicle.

Green tech finds: from solar power to the Super Bowl

Article: Green tech finds: from solar power to the Super Bowl

Super Bowl Sunday is coming up, and while I don’t pay enough attention to say whether it’ll be a good game, it will definitely be a green(er) game. That, plus cooler roofs for more efficient solar power, and a very quick look at over a century of global warming: your green tech finds for the week.

Buy renewable energy for your Volt: While the arguments about the energy sources for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids are generally really overblown and oversimplified, many EV drivers do want the cleanest power they can get for their vehicles. So, GM is developing a system for its OnStar platform that would notify Volt drivers when there’s renewable energy available on the grid so they could plug in at the right time. (via Earth 911)

What does global warming look like? If you’re thinking big picture in response to that question, the folks at NASA have released a video that shows 131 years of global temperature fluctuations in 26 seconds. (via Climate Central and @NRDC)

Green tech finds: Earthships and solar get affordable

Article: Green tech finds: Earthships and solar get affordable

Think “green tech” automatically means “expensive?” Nope: costs are dropping on everything from Earthships to solar power.

An affordable Earthship: I’ve been in love with the Earthship building concept for years, but no way I’d ever be able to afford one. That may be changing, though: the “Simple Survival” model Earthship is designed to provide the amenities of these self-sufficient structures without the “mortgage bondage.” Check it out above.

Design Dish: Pantone for Visa & the biggest dining table ever

Article: Design Dish: Pantone for Visa & the biggest dining table ever

The Liyuan Library: I’m a sucker for unusual library spaces, and this new construction in Huairou, China hits all the sweet spots. Tucked away in a small mountain village, the long, narrow structure blends into its surroundings with a reed-like outer layer that still allows for sunlight to trickle inside.

Collection of Occupy movement posters

Article: Collection of Occupy movement posters

If you plan on heading to an Occupy protest in your local hometown and want to wave a message that’s a step up from the crude signs made from pizza boxes and random flattened bits of cardboard (or like the one that Anne Hathaway was spotted carrying recently) then head on over to Occuprint. It’s a well produced online resource that “showcases posters from the worldwide Occupy movement” and “is meant to connect people with this work, and provide a base of support for print-related media within the Occupy movement.”

Design Dish: Moleskine logo winners & Prague's floating bathtub

Article: Design Dish: Moleskine logo winners & Prague's floating bathtub

Moleskinerie Logo Competition: This week, Moleskine and Designboom unveiled a shortlist of 117 designs that were submitted for the notebook company’s logo competition. The winning design by French artist Sylvain Bouyer offered a poetic definition for a “Moleskinerie,” the name of the company’s new blog: “A small graphic digression illustrating the idea that the greatest dreams often arise from just small things.”

First covers of famous magazines

Article: First covers of famous magazines

From The Atlantic Monthly in 1857 to Wired in 1993, here’s a fascinating look at the covers of the first issues of famous magazines, including, I’m sure, at least one of your favorites. It’s kind of amazing to see how these magazines have evolved over the years. Some are radically different in terms of design, focus and content, while others – most notably The New Yorker, whose first issue stars Eustace Tilley, or New York Magazine, with its breathtaking photo of the most beautiful skyline in the world – look as timeless and instantly familiar then as they do today…

Design Dish: Miami gets the rainbow effect & McLaren's new yin-yang factory

Article: Design Dish: Miami gets the rainbow effect & McLaren's new yin-yang factory

Coming Up Rainbows: After his first installation was removed in 2002 due to tightened 9/11 security measures, multimedia artist Christopher Janney is installing his colorful glass tiles in an overpass at Miami International Airport just in time for Art Basel…

Art Buzz: Buy art on your iPhone & real bullet holes from Iraq

Article: Art Buzz: Buy art on your iPhone & real bullet holes from Iraq

Geert Goiris: For his latest photo series, “Resonance,” Belgium-born photographer Geert Goiris offers up seemingly benign snapshots which, upon closer inspection, reveal uncanny, or off-putting elements. Most peculiar of all is an image of plastic office chairs arranged AA-style around an unremarkable wood table (which, you soon realize, has no legs)…