community

Tired of waiting for Community? Get some MORTIFIED Gillian Jacobs, pin-up style

Tired of waiting for Community? Get some MORTIFIED Gillian Jacobs, pin-up style

Hot damn! Did you see Community’s Gillian Jacobs, one of our latest THE MORTIFIED SESSIONS guests, sexin’ it up with costar Alison Brie over at been postponed indefinitely:

Tonight on THE MORTIFIED SESSIONS: Marc Maron and Community’s Gillian Jacobs

Tonight on THE MORTIFIED SESSIONS: Marc Maron and Community’s Gillian Jacobs

Tonight’s episode of THE MORTIFIED SESSIONS is a double shot of comedy with standup comic and online cult figure Marc Maron followed by Community’s Gillian Jacobs.

Top 10 reasons to love Gillian Jacobs

Top 10 reasons to love Gillian Jacobs

It certainly helped Gillian Jacobs to be born with beautiful, round eyes; perfect cheekbones; full lips; and a head of blonde hair that would make any young woman in Hollywood a bombshell. But it’s her work ethic, brave choices in acting roles, and charm that’s turnedm her into one of the most talked about starlets around. So even if the future of celebrated television series Community is still unclear, get familiar with some of Gillian’s other roles. Here are ten reasons to go mad for Gillian, and to get into her cheering section.

Top 10 reasons to love Gillian Jacobs

Top 10 reasons to love Gillian Jacobs

It certainly helped Gillian Jacobs to be born with beautiful, round eyes; perfect cheekbones; full lips; and a head of blonde hair that would make any young woman in Hollywood a bombshell. But it’s her work ethic, brave choices in acting roles, and charm that’s turnedm her into one of the most talked about starlets around. So even if the future of celebrated television series Community is still unclear, get familiar with some of Gillian’s other roles. Here are ten reasons to go mad for Gillian, and to get into her cheering section.

PUSH GIRLS: Pushing through the fear

PUSH GIRLS: Pushing through the fear

This week’s Chelsie-centric episode was an intimate and revealing look into the difficult adjustment period that comes with newly acquired disability. Chelsie is lucky to have four fabulous mentors, but she struggles with the changes going on in her life and in her body, and it was really refreshing to get an honest look at that. She was performing in front of her family for the first time, which was understandably nerve-wracking, and things didn’t go quite according to plan, but she held her head up high and got back out on the dance floor, which is hard for any of us to do when we feel like we’ve failed.

Green tech finds: Architects to the rescue!

Green tech finds: Architects to the rescue!

Can good design save the world? Well, maybe the Great Lakes, anyway. That, plus community-based solar, clothing recycling, and more: your green tech finds for the week.

The DIY bike seat: Ever wanted a second seat on your bicycle, without investing in a tandem? Or just carrying space without a trailer? Israeli designer Yael Livneh has you covered with his concept made from a used plastic milk crate. He’s entered the concept in Designboom’s Seoul Cycle Design competition. (via Unconsumption and @dothegreenthing)

Occupy the sun: We generally think of solar power as something that individual home and building owners do, but Francesca Rheannon at CSRWire takes a look at community-based efforts to adopt solar technology.

Homeowners associations: hubs for sustainable neighborhood development?

Homeowners associations: hubs for sustainable neighborhood development?

Few phrases get my blood boiling like “homeowners association.” Perhaps it’s because I’ve never lived in a neighborhood with one of these organizations, but I have this image of a handful of people snooping around the community looking for any deviation from the norm (like, say, solar panels), and hiding their lack of imagination under the guise of property values. I’ve told my wife many times that if we ever move into one of those neighborhoods, I’m going shopping for a flock of plastic pink flamingos.

The Perennials Project: building bridges in a shifting world

The Perennials Project: building bridges in a shifting world

Those of us in the green space may tend to equate the term “sustainable community” with practices like the growth of neighborhood farmers markets, the integration of renewables into a town or city’s energy mix or the presence of innovative green businesses. Behind all of these practices, of course, are people committed not only to a more environmentally benign way of life, but also to the viability of their communities.

An eclectic group of young creatives has redefined the word “perennials” to describe the people at the forefront of creating healthier, more livable communities. The Perennials Project will explore these people who, according to the project’s website, are “working toward a sustainable future by bridging divides.”

Tikkun Olam awards recognize teen gardening advocate

Tikkun Olam awards recognize teen gardening advocate

The Hebrew phrase Tikkun olam translates as “repair the world,” and has come to represent the notion of “human responsibility for fixing what is wrong with the world” in the Jewish faith. The Helen Diller Family Foundation and The Jewish Community Federation of San Francisco borrowed this phrase for their awards program that recognizes Jewish teens in California for work that embodies Tikkun olam. This year’s winners, which each receive $36,000 for college, or for supporting their philanthropic work, have just been announced, and include young people working on issues ranging from the refugee crisis in Darfur to access to textbooks in Liberia to providing school supplies for disadvantaged youth in Los Angeles.

When the farmers market isn't sustainable enough: ForageSF

When the farmers market isn't sustainable enough: ForageSF

Farmers markets have become the face of the local foods movement, and they’re popping up everywhere… and succeeding, by and large. People like the idea of buying from local food growers and producers, and markets create a stronger sense of community than most grocery stores.

But what if you want to go a step further in your efforts to eat sustainably? What if you’d like to learn more about food that’s available for the picking almost anywhere (which we often consider weeds or other undesirable plants)? What if you’d like to try out local food from merchants who simply can’t afford the permitting required for selling their goods at the local market? What if you’d just like to make a salad like the one above… from food you find on a walk through the neighborhood?

Iowa organic farmer plans cohousing community

Iowa organic farmer plans cohousing community

You might argue that the “community” in community-supported agriculture (or CSA) can be a bit misleading. Sure, CSA arrangements, in which consumers buy shares in a local farm’s crops, cut down tremendously on food miles, give us more insight into the cultivation of the things we eat, and often give us the opportunity to get to know the farmers involved in growing what goes on our plate… but does that always result in community?

Searching for sustainable community… by bike

Searching for sustainable community… by bike

It might be tempting to label the “journey across America in search of ______” motif a clichĂ©… except it still resonates powerfully. From 19th-century travelogues to Kerouac’s On the Road to Albert Brooks’ Lost in America, the idea of traveling the US as a quest for meaning captures out imaginations, and gives us space for a bit of introspection.

Ryan Mlynarczyk and Mandy Creighton went beyond the dreaming about such adventures most of us do, and decided to set out on their own quest across the country… this time in search of sustainable community. In 2008, they ditched almost everything, and set off across the US on bikes to explore ecovillages, communes, collectives… every form of simpler, more sustainable communities they could find. They’ve visited over 100 communities across the country, and are now pulling footage of their journey into a feature-length film titled WITHIN REACH.