Andrew Garfield

THE SOCIAL NETWORK

Article: THE SOCIAL NETWORK

Jesse Eisenberg as Mark Zuckerberg, the world’s youngest billionaire
THE SOCIAL NETWORK is the age-old story that pits the jocks against the geeks in a power play for popularity, only this time around there’s more at stake than just getting in with the cool kids. There’s a multi-billion dollar idea up for grabs, and it takes place at Harvard, which means that everyone, even the buff, blonde crew team champs, the Winklevoss twins, are just as smart and ambitious as the king geek, Mark Zuckerberg. Played by Jesse Eisenberg (THE SQUID AND THE WHALE) as supremely nerdy, even witheringly so, Zuckerberg is seldom without his uniform of baggy sweatshirts and Adidas sandals with white socks, all items of clothing not seen much in the Harvard final clubs (Fox, Phoenix, Porcellian) Zuckerberg is obsessed with. When he finds himself unable to get into any of them, and his girlfriend dumps him for his pathetic obsession with Harvard’s social elite, Zuckerberg and his roommates write an algorithm that soon spawns Facebook, or The Facebook, as it was originally called.

Spike Jonze's short film I'M HERE

Article: Spike Jonze's short film I'M HERE

In his feature films, Spike Jonze has successfully melded his singular sensibility with other equally distinctive voices (Charlie Kaufman in BEING JOHN MALKOVICH and ADAPTATION, Maurice Sendak and Dave Eggers in WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE). But for a taste of pure, unadulterated Jonze — to really appreciate the deadpan high concepts, the absurdist melancholy, the skewed sense of enchantment — turn to his music videos and short films.

Written and directed by Jonze (and financed by Absolut Vodka), the half-hour I’M HERE, the high point of a strong opening shorts program, follows in the venerable tradition of sci-fi stories about robots who discover the contradictions of the human heart. Sheldon (Andrew Garfield) is a sad-eyed android librarian in an unfriendly Los Angeles where the robots lead an underclass existence and seem fated for a lonely obsolescence. (He and his fragile fellow bots certainly look like last century’s models: boxy heads, Lego-like appendages, protruding wires.)