american geophysical union

Global Warming Forecast to Delay Ozone Layer Recovery

Global Warming Forecast to Delay Ozone Layer Recovery

BALTIMORE, Maryland, February 6, 2009 (ENS) – Increasing greenhouse gases could stall the recovery of stratospheric ozone in some regions of the Earth, according to new research by a team from Johns Hopkins University. The scientists warn that increased rates of skin cancer in those regions might result. Darryn Waugh, a professor in the Department…

Poll: Thousands of Scientists Affirm Human-Caused Global Warming

Poll: Thousands of Scientists Affirm Human-Caused Global Warming

CHICAGO, Illinois, January 20, 2009 (ENS) – While the bitter cold of President Barack Obama’s Inauguration Day in Washington may seem to contradict the idea that global warming continues, a new survey reveals consensus among scientists about the reality of climate change and its likely cause. The survey of 3,146 earth scientists from around the…

The Most Potent Unknown Greenhouse Gas Revealed

The Most Potent Unknown Greenhouse Gas Revealed

SAN DIEGO, California, October 24, 2008 (ENS) – A gas used in manufacture of flat panel televisions, computer displays, microcircuits, and thin-film solar panels is 17,000 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, and it is far more prevalent in the atmosphere than previously estimated. The powerful greenhouse gas nitrogen trifluoride, NF3, is…

Satellite Cluster Proves Pollution Changes Clouds, Climate

Satellite Cluster Proves Pollution Changes Clouds, Climate

FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida, May 27, 2008 (ENS) – Using data from instruments in a constellation of NASA and French satellites, scientists are learning more about the link between clouds, pollution and rainfall. Four NASA satellites – Aqua, Aura, CloudSat and CALIPSO and the French Space Agency’s PARASOL – make up the string of satellites in…

Human Pollution Drives Weekday Southeast Storms

Human Pollution Drives Weekday Southeast Storms

GREENBELT, Maryland, February 2, 2008 (ENS) – Summertime storms in the southeastern United States drop more rainfall midweek than on weekends, and NASA scientists say air pollution from human activities, such as emissions from traffic, businesses and factories, is likely driving that trend. The link between rainfall and the day of the week is evident…