alaska

Open pit mining sucks, says Robert Redford, Alaskans and logic

Article: Open pit mining sucks, says Robert Redford, Alaskans and logic

So, why wouldn’t residents of Bristol Bay, Alaska want this open pit gold and copper mine planned for the area? I mean, doesn’t that mean jobs and economic growth (the standard answer to all questions about new extraction efforts)? Are they a bunch of communists?

As Companies Gather for Shareholder Meetings, Opposition to Bristol Bay Mine Mounts

Article: As Companies Gather for Shareholder Meetings, Opposition to Bristol Bay Mine Mounts

As Companies Gather for Shareholder Meetings, Opposition to Bristol Bay Mine Mounts

Voter to Miller and Murkowski: Bite Me

Article: Voter to Miller and Murkowski: Bite Me

So Republican Lisa Murkowski has been announced the winner in Alaska’s U.S. Senate race against Palin-supported Joe Miller as a rare write-in vote. While growing up in Alaska in a decidedly Democrat household, I never ever thought I’d be rooting (okay, half-heartedly, sorta, lesser-of-two-evils, casually rooting) for a Murkowski, a blue-blood political family. The way…

Green tech finds (7/22/10)

Article: Green tech finds (7/22/10)

Infrared photography, a green Motel 6, and solar in the South Pole… this week’s green tech finds.

Lower-carbon flying: Air travel is pretty energy and carbon-intensive, but GE’s trying to make flying a bit greener with “software that will help pilots choose the most environmentally efficient flight trajectories taking into account conditions on four dimensions – latitude, longitude, altitude and time.”
California’s the green energy leader… right? Maybe now, but according to Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic, Alaska and Hawaii may have some of the most innovative approaches out there for moving to low-carbon energy sources.

Alaskan green home concept borrows indigenous knowledge

Article: Alaskan green home concept borrows indigenous knowledge

Many critics of environmentalism accuse greenies of “wanting to take us back to the 19th century.” Residents of Quinhagak, Alaska, appear to be OK with that idea… or going back even further … at least in terms of their housing stock.

Turns out that many of the homes in this small village on the Bering Sea are in bad shape: recent engineering reports showed “…that a sample-test of 55 houses built in the 1970s showed that many were ‘unsafe for occupancy’ because of such problems as rotting beams and moldy walls.” These same houses are also really expensive to heat in the winter — a homeowner may use as much as 750 gallons of heating oil a year. Village leaders decided something had to be done, and commissioned the Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) in Fairbanks to design a plan for a house that would meet the needs of Quinhagak residents… without costing an arm and a leg.