Adrien Brody

Chapter Three: What A (Push) Girl Wants

Article: Chapter Three: What A (Push) Girl Wants

Don’t get freaked out by the title of this chapter – it’s not everyday that Christina Aguilera and a pre-wigged out Amanda Bynes can be referenced at the same time! But seriously, with the exception of Auti, who is married to the perfectly be-dimpled Eric, our girls are all looking for that special someone who will knock their wheels off.

And you don’t have to be a Calvin Klein model to catch their eye. Grab your chemistry set, put some Aretha Franklin on and have some R-E-S-P-E-C-T.

Emile Hirsch, Gary Oldman & Jamie Bell: The gentlemen wear Prada

Article: Emile Hirsch, Gary Oldman & Jamie Bell: The gentlemen wear Prada

Miuccia Prada can be as self-effacing as she’d like, eschewing the title of artist in the debate as to whether or not fashion designers should be consider as such, but she cannot deny her natural instinct for drawing attention. She was a mime in her youth. Her runway shows have always been blockbusters with plenty of star power in the front row, but it seems La Signora Prada is blurring the lines between art and fashion once again in her latest Men’s campaign for her Fall line, enlisting Gary Oldman, Garrett Hedlund, Jamie Bell and Willem Dafoe as mannequins for her designs. Like everything else she does, we can’t help but chat about it.

Criterion releases THE DARJEELING LIMITED

Article: Criterion releases THE DARJEELING LIMITED

When Wes Anderson’s fifth film, THE DARJEELING LIMITED, came out in 2007, it was called a “precious…flawed, but nonetheless beautiful handmade object as apt to win affection as to provoke annoyance” (The New York Times). Critic A.O. Scott was talking about Anderson’s meticulously orchestrated compositions, a trademark that has steadily grown in complexity over the span of his career, just compare any shot of the train in India to the motel scenes in BOTTLE ROCKET. Every color, every piece of fabric, every accessory is exactly in its place. This obsessive attention to detail is what led many critics, like Scott, to doubt whether Anderson had a real story to tell, or whether the story was too weighed down by the trappings of an overactive art department. “Humanism lies either beyond his grasp or outside the range of his interests.”