Ryan Kearney

Ryan Kearney is a former staff writer, editor, and critic for several newspapers in the Boston area, as well as the alt-weekly New Haven Advocate and the music website, Pitchforkmedia.com. He is currently at work on a travel memoir set in Latin America. Ryan previously provided a glimpse into the daily experience at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival on SundanceChannel.com, and now he'll be turning his attention to the indie music scene.

Craig Brewer Finds Inspiration in The Hills

Article: Craig Brewer Finds Inspiration in The Hills

Craig Brewer is absolutely in love with Memphis. You can tell just by the way he talks about it. He literally sat on the edge of his seat, his hands clasped, while speaking with me this afternoon at the Rock Band Lounge about his new project: $5 COVER, an MTV web series about the intertwining—or “incestuous,” as he put it—lives of musicians in his Tennessee hometown.

Kristof's Wake-up Call

Article: Kristof's Wake-up Call

Nicholas Kristof and Samantha Power Nicholas Kristof, the New York Times columnist, is a tireless journalist and advocate for human rights around the word. Me? When I attended a conversation featuring Kristof and Samantha Power at 10:30 this morning, I was just plain tired—I blame the party publicists—and not exactly in the mood to hear…

Who Did, and Didn't, Look Good on the Dance Floor

Article: Who Did, and Didn't, Look Good on the Dance Floor

At Sundance it sometimes feels as though there are only two types of festivalgoers: those who come to see films, and those who come to see celebrities. I’d like to think I’m in the former category. When I see someone “famous,” I don’t stop and stare, or point, or attempt a blurry photo with my…

Rachael Yamagata is Not as Sad as She Sounds

Article: Rachael Yamagata is Not as Sad as She Sounds

Rachael Yamagata A week ago, when I saw the lineup for the Sundance ASCAP Music CafĂ©, I was disappointed but not surprised. The festival, for all its talk of supporting artistic risk in filmmaking, has never showcased particularly challenging musicians. In fact, the most exciting names to appear at the Music CafĂ© in recent years—Patti…

IT MIGHT BE LOUD: No "Might" About It

Article: IT MIGHT BE LOUD: No "Might" About It

This afternoon’s screening of IT MIGHT GET LOUD embodied just about everything I love and hate about going to the movies. For starters, the Library Center Theater was arctic cold before the screening began—not because the heat was off, but because the air conditioning was on full blast. No, I’m not joking. I asked a…

TYSON: Less Bitey, More Talky

Article: TYSON: Less Bitey, More Talky

In this documentary about the troubled (and that’s putting it kindly) former boxing champ, he remains defiant.

Sitting on a living room couch in a blue button-down, Tyson admits to “extracurricular activities” during his marriage with Robin Givens, but then seems only to regret it because he lacked the “skullduggery”—a word he used, to my surprise, appropriately—to avoid getting caught. More after the jump…

A night with BROOKLYN’S FINEST, sort of

Article: A night with BROOKLYN’S FINEST, sort of

Richard Gere in Brooklyn’s Finest Getting to, and into, the BROOKLYN’S FINEST premiere last night was an even bigger ordeal than I’d expected. My boss and I left the office at the bottom of Main Street at 5:45 p.m., giving us a half-hour to make it to the Eccles Theatre. Cutting it a little close,…

BROOKLYN'S FINEST: "best film ever made"?

Article: BROOKLYN'S FINEST: "best film ever made"?

Question and answer sessions at Sundance are, in theory, a great idea. In practice, not so much—especially those that follow “big” films like BROOKLYN’S FINEST, director Antoine Fuqua’s latest foray into the world of conflicted cops (after TRAINING DAY). Consider what the first questioner said to Fuqua once he took the stage: “First of all…

Menstrual Humor from the Stars of SPRING BREAKDOWN

Article: Menstrual Humor from the Stars of SPRING BREAKDOWN

Amy Poehler, Rachel Dratch and Parker Posey at the Sundance Channel Studio Saturday Night Live’s Amy Poehler and Rachel Dratch, director Ryan Shiraki, Parker Posey, Jane Lynch and Missi Pyle squeezed onto the Sundance Channel studio’s couch this afternoon, ostensibly to discuss their movie SPRING BREAKDOWN, but instead it became a game of comedic one-upmanship.…

What Not to Do at Night

Article: What Not to Do at Night

Yesterday, I wrote that Main Street on Thursday night was sure to be “vitalized.” My bad. It was … not dead exactly, but probably would have passed for an average weekend night here during spring break.

New Frontiers: The Future of Filmmaking?

Article: New Frontiers: The Future of Filmmaking?

One of thousands of digital snapshots that make up “We Feel Fine,” an installation at New Frontiers’ headquarters With Sundance billing this year as its 25th anniversary, Robert Redford today was asked the expected questions about the festival’s past vs. present, but he resisted nostalgia and instead focused on the festival’s future. Sundance hasn’t changed…

Festival Kickoff: Movies to Watch Out For

Article: Festival Kickoff: Movies to Watch Out For

Each January, as the Sundance Film Festival approaches, there’s a mad scramble among journalists and critics to pinpoint something, anything new to differentiate their articles from the ones they wrote last year—and usually they turn to the documentaries for their hook. One year it’s LGBT issues, another year it’s Iraq. This year, the festival’s 25th anniversary (well, since the Sundance Institute took over its management anyway), the popular “news hook” is the environment. By way of evidence, writers point to the number of environmental docs in competition this year: 5 out of 32 total. But I just looked at last year’s film guide and counted three environmental docs. From 3 to 5—not such a dramatic increase, is it?