Kim Masters

Kim Masters formerly covered the business of entertainment for NPR and has been a contributing editor at Time, Esquire and Vanity Fair. Her work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Boston Globe and the Philadelphia Inquirer. Masters is the author of The Keys to the Kingdom: The Rise of Michael Eisner and the Fall of Everybody Else (2000, HarperCollins) and co-author with Nancy Griffin of the best-selling and award-winning Hit & Run: How Jon Peters and Peter Guber Took Sony for a Ride in Hollywood (1996, Simon & Schuster). From 1990 through 1996, Masters covered politics for the Washington Post's Style Section. Throughout her career, she has covered a variety of beats, from legal affairs and education to the Supreme Court. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and daughter.

Boobs and Bonito Tartar

Article: Boobs and Bonito Tartar

As every veteran knows, the Festival attracts all sorts–including genre of people who are not part of the film business but who thirst for a taste of Hollywood glamour. Such people seemed to be flocking to Chefdance, an annual series of dinners intended by founder Kenny Griswold to create “a dining experience that would match the film experience during the Festival.” Griswold imports a number of renowned chefs to create leisurely meals enjoyed by dozens of people seated along long, white-linen-draped tables

R.J. Cutler Reveals the Impenetrable Mystique of Anna Wintour

Article: R.J. Cutler Reveals the Impenetrable Mystique of Anna Wintour

THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE is, as the Festival catalogue promises, a clever film. It doesn’t launch a frontal attack on Wintour–she hardly would have turned up at the premiere if it did. But it pokes at her slyly, from the side. It is revelatory about Wintour’s relationship with her family and it explores the enduring partnership between the editor-in-chief and the far more likeable (in the film, at least) creative director Grace Coddington

The Festival's Favorite Son with No Name

Article: The Festival's Favorite Son with No Name

The Festival has something of the miraculous about it. Not only is the orchestration of so many screenings and events in so many venues a marvel but it occurred to me that, having picked movies in a fairly random fashion,

I have seen encountered a diverse bunch of films and filmmakers. Black, white, Asian, Latino, gay, straight. For that to happen by no design at all is impressive.

Dealing with the Doors: Very Strange Indeed

Article: Dealing with the Doors: Very Strange Indeed

Unless you are ardently obsessed with the Doors, be glad you’re not Tom DiCillo. Festival veteran DiCillo’s first feature-length documentary is WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE, a film that’s meant to depict the legendary band–and not just late legendary lead singer Jim Morrison.

RUDO Y CURSI reunites Y TU MAMA TAMBIEN stars Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna

Article: RUDO Y CURSI reunites Y TU MAMA TAMBIEN stars Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna

I was licking my chops as I headed into the premiere of Rudo y Cursi–reuniting Y TU MAMA TAMBIEN stars Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna. And so was the rest of the audience. What talent! This is the very first venture from Cha Cha Cha, the production company formed by Alfonso Cuaron, Guillermo del Toro and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.

Real Madmen Make Even Reagan Look Good

Article: Real Madmen Make Even Reagan Look Good

ART & COPY is a slick documentary about the genuis ad men and women who created such iconic campaigns as “Got Milk?”, “Think Different” (Apple), and Nike’s “Just Do It.” “Sundance gets a lot of grief about getting too commercial and selling out,” director Doug Pray said in introducing the film. “I just want to warn you guys–there’s ads in my movie.”

Judd Apatow and Mike Leigh Had a Baby, Her Name is HUMPDAY

Article: Judd Apatow and Mike Leigh Had a Baby, Her Name is HUMPDAY

Humpday HUMPDAY turns out to be what I’d hoped–funny and a bit more. For me, anyway, this buddy film about two straight guys who decide (almost inexplicably) to star in their own gay porn film was kind of a small version of Judd Apatow and Mike Leigh having a baby. This film by Lynn Shelton…

Who You Calling Wack?

Article: Who You Calling Wack?

The honchos at Sony Pictures Classics may not be the most popular guys at Sundance. Michael Barker and Tom Bernard are not known for whipping out bulging wallets to buy and when they do make a deal, some say they don’t send movies into the world with a big enough push. But if some at Sundance have issues with Bernard, he has some issues with Sundance.

James Schamus on Hamlet 2: So What?

Article: James Schamus on Hamlet 2: So What?

Focusfeatures CEO James Schamus is a tad late to the Festival this year due to a bug. But what’s really bugging him is the amount of prognosticating about sales and the state of film financing that goes on in advance of the event. “We have layered over the possibility of any new experience we might have with this ongoing discourse,” he laments.

State-sponsored Sex and Stab Wounds

Article: State-sponsored Sex and Stab Wounds

The opening-night premiere of claymation film Mary and Max made it clear that the Festival decided to throw a curveball for its opening pitch.

Cinetic Gives The Skinny On Sundance 2009

Article: Cinetic Gives The Skinny On Sundance 2009

There are many reasons for people to be nervous at Sundance, especially in this difficult economy. But those on the guest list for the big Cinetic party can relax on one account: The notoriously aggressive sellers (who brought NAPOLEOAN DYNAMITE and many other hits to Sundance) have nailed down their biggest sponsor for their fabled…

Robert Redford, Spiked Lemonade and Bush-bashing

Article: Robert Redford, Spiked Lemonade and Bush-bashing

The High West Distillery was serving lemonade spiked with rye whiskey in the lobby of the Egyptian Theater before Robert Redford turned up to address the press about what may or may not be the Festival’s 25th anniversary.

Getting Attention vs. Vying For It

Article: Getting Attention vs. Vying For It

Flying in to Salt Lake City, those snow-covered peaks are a majestic sight. The drive up to Park City is an easy jog on I-80. It’s sunny and clear and the madness is about to begin. I’ve read and talked and talked and read. Which movies are likely to emerge from the pack? I’ve checked…

PUSH: Suicide and Incest at Sundance

Article: PUSH: Suicide and Incest at Sundance

PUSH, starring Lenny Kravitz and Mo’Nique Lee Daniels is anxious but not anxious. He’s been to the Festival before, as producer of the 2004 film THE WOODSMAN, the Kevin Bacon film about a pedophile that is what they call in the industry “a tough sell.” This year he’s got PUSH, another harrowing story about an…

Festival Programmer (John Cooper) On The Festival, The Economic Meltdown And Smelly Theaters

Article: Festival Programmer (John Cooper) On The Festival, The Economic Meltdown And Smelly Theaters

Good news! Weather.com is promising balmy temperatures in the 30s for the kickoff of the Sundance Film Festival this week. But if you listen to the words of John Cooper, director of festival programming, you can tell there’s still a chill in the air. He says there are wonderful films at the festival this year…

Sundance 2009: Different Perspectives On This Year's Festival

Article: Sundance 2009: Different Perspectives On This Year's Festival

It’s hard enough to leave sunny Los Angeles for freezing Park City but this year, I’m just back from the tropical warmth of Hawaii. I don’t expect much sympathy but still, can you concede that it’s a shock to the system? Shorts and tee shirts are out of the suitcase; long johns and unflattering outerwear…