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Green tech finds (8/11/11)

Lots of news on the car front this week, plus electronic paper, and a (partially) green-powered STAR TREK theme park in Jordan (yeah, Jordan).

Lotus’ wine and cheese-powered car: Okay, not exactly, but the British automaker’s Exige 270E Tri-fuel concept can do 0-60 in under four seconds on ethanol made from “undrinkable wine (whew!), whey (a byproduct of making cheese), and surplus chocolate.” Check it out in action above. (via The Discovery Channel)

Ford getting into the solar business? Kind of. They’re partnering with SunPower to offer future buyers of the company’s planned electric vehicles a rooftop solar system that could power the car completely on renewable energy.

How could you really save with an EV? There are plenty of general calculations about how much less an electric vehicle would cost you to drive, but Wheego’s new per-mile calculator gives you a specific comparison between their Life model and your gas-powered car based on local electricity rates and gas prices.

A Redbox for bike repair: Lost some air in your bike tires? Blew out an inner tube? Brakes loose? Bike Fixation is a small, Minneapolis-based company that’s developed a vending machine for supplies needed for bike repair on the go. (via Crisp Green)

Green STAR TREK theme park planned for Jordan: Mr. Spock would call it eminently logical – a planned Trekkie theme park in Aqaba will incorporate numerous green energy features as well as an environmental education attraction. (via Treehugger)

Neutralizing CO2: A Finnish nuclear physicist has patented a process that wouldn’t store or sequester carbon dioxide emissions from power plants – it would neutralize them (and create a byproduct useful to the electronics industry). (via Good News from Finland)

Electronic paper that consumes no electricity: Still a fan of notebooks for jotting down ideas? You may not need them soon: Taiwanese scientists have developed a form of “electronic paper” (similar to an e-reader) that has no backlighting, which means it consumes no electricity. (via Gizmodo)

Got a find we missed this week? Even if it doesn’t appeal to car guys or Trekkies, share it with us below.

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Image credit: jasonb42882 at Flickr under a Creative Commons license