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New Austin grocery store will be packaging-free

On our kitchen counter, my wife has a set of glass jars designed for storing staples: flour, sugar, coffee, tea, etc. Of course, we have to buy the products that go into those jars at the store, empty them from their packaging, and then either recycle or trash whatever they came in.

Wouldn’t it be great if we could just take those jars to the store and fill them?

That the idea behind in.gredients, a grocery store slated to open in Austin, Texas this Fall in the East Manor neighborhood. Brothers Joseph, Patrick, and Christian Lane, along with partners Brian Nunnery and Christopher Pepe, were all a bit shocked to discover that 40% of the waste that goes to landfills is packaging that’s been used one time. So, they decided to develop a store concept that avoided all of that packaging — think of the bulk section of the typical store becoming, well, the store (except for some items that must be packaged for health reasons… and they’ll only carry these items if they come in recyclable packaging).

They didn’t stop with their focus on packaging, though: in.gredients will sell organic whenever possible, all-natural when it’s not, and all items will be either locally produced or locally sourced. They’ll also stick to seasonal produce.

Finally, if you don’t feel like lugging the jars and plastic containers to the store, they will have containers available… and (you guessed it), those containers will all be compostable.

Sounds like a great concept… and judging from the buzz in.gredients is generating, I’m not the only one that thinks so. If you’d like to support their efforts (even if you’re not in Austin), they are seeking donors through an Indiegogo campaign (and they’re getting close to their goal… just under $4,000 to go in the next 39 days).

What do you think — would you be willing to go beyond the reusable bags and carry food containers to the store? Check out the video above that explains the concept further, and share your thoughts with us.

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