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Earth Week green tech finds (4/21/11)

samsung replenish green smart phone

A new green smart phone, water from diesel, and the dirtiness of your data… your Earth Week green tech finds.

  • Recyclemania at Dell: The Austin, TX-based computer and electronics maker announced it recycled more than 150 million pounds of e-waste in 2010. (via GreenTech Pastures)

  • Google, Department of Energy mapping EV charging stations: The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory is working with Google to map electric vehicle charging stations, along with other alternative vehicle fuels. (via Earth Techling)

  • Sprint’s new green smart phone: The new Samsung Replenish from Sprint is made partially from recycled bio-plastics, features the Green ID pack, and even comes with a pre-paid envelope for recycling. For an extra $30 bucks, you can also add a solar charger. That’s it above… (via Mobiledia)

  • Ontario schools going renewable: The government of Ontario, Canada announced that 126 of its schools will have renewable energy technology installed by this Fall.

  • Solar power… without solar cells: Researchers at the University of Michigan are experimenting with “harnessing the magnetic power of light” to create technology for capturing solar energy without semiconductors… which would lower the cost. (via Calfinder’s Residential Solar blog)

  • The environmental impact of your data: Greenpeace asks “How dirty is your data?” in a new report about the energy sources running data centers around the world. Yahoo! and Google get high marks for renewable energy use; Facebook, not so much…

  • Mobile water availability notification: People in the developing world often have to deal with unreliable piped water supplies. NextDrop is a mobile service that notifies residents when water is available so they’re not waiting around… (via Springwise)

  • Water from diesel fuel? Sounds a little scary, but for soldiers in the field, experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory could allow them to extract water from burning diesel (a standard supply). (via Cleantechnica)



Got another find? Lots of them this week… so share with us!

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Image credit: Sprint